The Church of St. Martin belongs to the oldest culture relics of the region Liptov. A fresco from the 13th century was uncovered in the church, and it is one of the oldest compactly preserved wall paintings in Slovakia. The church was built as a dominant building on a hill of the eastern hill of Mních around 1260. Originally, it served as a parish church for villages of Likavka and Lisková. The village of Martinček arose after the charge had been built. It is a mixture of a transitional Romanesque and Gothic style with a predominance of early Gothic stylistic elements. Rare paintings were discovered during a restoration survey in 1999.  In course of 2000 – 2002, wall paintings were gradually uncovered and restored in the entire interior of the church. The cycle of paintings in the presbytery are among the best preserved within the territory of Slovakia and probably the oldest of its kind in the region Liptov.

Original tower windows have remained preserved and are very rare. Upper parts show the features of Romanesque style and lower parts early Gothic style. Despite various changes in the following centuries, the architecture of the building retains its original form making it attractive and unique even today. The author of wall paintings is unknown, but probably these frescoes were painted around 1300. According to rumours and theories of older historians the church was built by Templars, who could have lived in a monastery on a nearby hill Mních.  Modern historiography, however, rejects the presence of Templars in Martinček.

On a hill just below the small church 30 wooden marquises can be seen, which were built by residents to store potatoes and vegetables and have been used till today.